Difficult Customers

Posted: July 7, 2007 in Wheelchair Wisdom

My roles in the mobility industry are varied, and among my most rewarding is that of customer service. Often consumers and providers contact me regarding products my company manufacturers, and sometimes to assist with resolving issues, whether with a user’s chair, a provider’s service, or a pending order.

In dealing with so many people over the years, I’m still surprised when I hear an industry person refer to an in instance involving a “difficult customer,” commonly referring to a boisterous consumer, not-so-politely calling the provider and manufacturer alike. As it may surprise some, however, I can’t say that I’ve ever worked with a truly “difficult customer.” To the contrary, I’ve worked with a lot of phenomenal end-users simply trying to obtain the mobility they need.

And, a lot of them are rightfully frustrated, justly boisterous, and properly put off when we speak. Heck, a few have started out by yelling at me – but, understandably so. I look at it this way: Mobility is as essential to ones life as sustenance; yet, the entire process for some is all but impossible to transcend, all but preventing needed mobility. Too often, the funding process alone can take months, with delay after delay; then, the ordering process can be overwhelmingly stressful, not knowing what product will best meet one’s needs, having to place trust in others; then, the frustration of waiting for delivery; and, then, waiting for repairs when needed. Then, let’s add to the process the reality of everyday life for many with disabilities – health issues, unreliable attendant care, financial worries, transportation issues, and on, and on, and on. What’s more, these issues – and mobility needs – don’t operate on a business schedule, they don’t go away when others aren’t answering phones or shipping deliveries. Put simply, on a Saturday, fathom having a bladder infection, your personal care attendant didn’t show up till noon, you can’t afford to fix the transmission in your van, then add to that having to somehow survive all weekend without a working powerchair.

I could never call anyone facing similar situations a “difficult customer.” However, I certainly can call them real people, deserving absolute attention.

For those dealing with “difficult customers,” I suggest empathizing with the customer’s frustrations rather than taking offense – use understanding as inspiration toward better service. And, to difficult customers,” themselves, I say find those who understand, and reach out to them with the courtesy and dedication to which they serve you.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s